Mind Your Mental Health - September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

Mind Your Mental Health - September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

This observance raises awareness and connects individuals experiencing suicidal ideation to treatment services, in addition to offering support to those previously affected by suicide.

  • Suicidal thoughts can affect anyone regardless of age, gender or background. Suicide often stems from an untreated mental health condition.
  • If a person seems in danger of hurting themselves, call 911 immediately.
  • If you’re concerned about a suicide but don’t know what to do, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Trained counselors are available 24/7 to speak with you or your loved one.
  • If you’re uncomfortable talking by phone, send a text to the National Alliance on Mental Illness at 741-741 for free crisis support via text message from a crisis counselor.
  • Reassure the at-risk individual with words such as, “I might not be able to understand exactly how you feel, but I care about you and want to help.”

September is National Recovery Month! During September, Stamp Out Stigma is taking this opportunity to discuss substance use disorder recovery. We will be highlighting the importance of speaking openly about recovery and finding treatment, since there is still stigma associated with mental illness and addiction. It’s our job to help end the stigma surrounding mental health by sharing resources and starting conversations.

Throughout the month of September, we encourage family, friends, and loved ones to learn more about mental illness and substance use disorder and what resources are available to help those find treatment. Here are some important facts you should know:

Here are some important facts you should know:

  • Among the 20.2 million adults in the U.S. who experienced a substance use disorder, 50.5%—10.2 million adults—had a co-occurring mental illness.
  • More women with AMI (48.8%) received mental health treatment than men with AMI (33.9%).
  • The misuse of prescription opioids and use of heroin is one of the most significant public health issues in the United States. Opioid abuse claims more lives than motor vehicle crashes.
  • According to research that tracks individuals in treatment over extended periods, most people who get into and remain in treatment stop using drugs and improve their occupational, social, and psychological functioning.
  • 50% of individuals with eating disorders abused alcohol or illicit drugs, a rate five times higher than the general population.
  • The misuse of prescription opioids and use of heroin is one of the most significant public health issues in the United States. Opioid abuse claims more lives than motor vehicle crashes.
  • According to research that tracks individuals in treatment over extended periods, most people who get into and remain in treatment stop using drugs and improve their occupational, social, and psychological functioning.
  • 50% of individuals with eating disorders abused alcohol or illicit drugs, a rate five times higher than the general population.

Remember, mental illness does not discriminate. Join us to help bring attention to the importance of sharing mental health stories and help improve the lives of millions of Americans living with a mental illness.

Help is available! Visit https://www.magellanhealthcare.com/about/bh-resources/mymh/ or contact your program to learn more about how to help yourself or someone you care about.